Dangers of Food Poisoning in Monsoon
15 May, 2021 by
Progno Health Medical Team

Dangers of Food Poisoning in Monsoon


            The transition phase from the summer to monsoon is ideal for bacterial growth, due to high' humidity and temperature fluctuations, resulting in an increased incidence of food poisoning cases. Food poisoning can be caused by food or water that Is contaminated by bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Symptoms of food poisoning are diarrhea, painful cramps, nausea, and vomiting. Experts say that the best way to prevent Infections is to maintain a healthy and safe lifestyle.


Tips to keep infections at bay

• Avoid eating unhygienic food on the roadside, especially 'Panipuri' &' chat', where the water is risky. Also, avoid eating places with poor or suspect unhygienic practices.

• Choose the right food, especially if you have no other option but to eat outside. Eat food that is served steaming hot. The heat kills the pathogens and lowers the risk of acquiring Infection.

• Avoid eating undercooked food, more so with meat or eggs. Undercooked foods are likely to be contaminated with bacteria that can cause food poisoning.

 

• Drink filtered or boiled water. During the monsoons, the risk of contamination of water sources is pretty high. If It Is not feasible every day, at least drink boiled water when you're sick But try to carry a bottle of water when going out Instead of drinking from an unknown source.

• Wash your hands frequently, especially before eating. It is the best way to prevent many infections.

• Avoid food if you are not sure that it has been stored safely. Food left at room temperature for too long may contain bacteria or toxins that can't be destroyed by cooking.


• Keep raw foods separate from ready-to-eat foods Keep raw meat, poultry, fish, and shellfish away from other foods to prevent cross-contamination.

• Avoid swimming. Swimming is a good exercise, but not for people with lowered immunity. So, if you're down with flu or have Just recovered from an Illness, avoid swimming to prevent stomach flu.